The more things change…

Whilst doing a bit of research earlier I came across an article in The Observer that I missed when it was published. With continuing threats to heritage funding in the UK dominating many archaeological discussions I thought it would be worth summarising here for anyone else who didn’t see it :

“Large quantities of important archaeological material, the fruit of years of fieldwork, are at present lying, unexamined…” Continue reading

The Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxfordshire and…a conclusion (part 4)

AT THE END…

This is the final in a series of posts on my chapter (co-authored with Dr Dan Hicks) on Oxfordshire in the book World Archaeology at the Pitt Rivers Museum: a characterization. Conceived by Dr Dan Hicks (Curator of Archaeology) and managed by both Dan and Dr Alice Stevenson (Researcher in World Archaeology) the project involved a host of specialists examining over 30,000 objects from 134 countries in a process not too dissimilar from a  MoRPHE post-excavation assessment.

This post presents my personal thoughts on the significance and potential of the Oxfordshire archaeology collections of the Pitt Rivers Museum. It is based on notes I wrote in 2010, so some aspects are likely out of date now (particularly references to ‘big society’ and a ‘new government’). You can read my introductory thoughts here, the chapter itself here and an extended discussion on Pitt-Rivers (the man) and his work at Dorchester Dykes here. Continue reading